Globe’s Marche uses “fat” 17 times in Rob Ford column

Just when you think journalism can’t sink any further, Stephen Marche pens this pile.

“The mounds of fat that encircle Rob Ford’s body like great deflated tires of defeat are truly unprecedented in Canadian politics. His angry fat is perfectly of our time”

“His fat is all he has going for him; it makes him look working-class even though he’s a drunk-driving, second-generation political dilettante, a man who has never been faced with the financial difficulties of ordinary people”

Seriously, how does the editor keep his/her job after allowing this to be printed? (see here)

Update: Looks like the Globe pulled this article.

Update: I was sent the text of this article:

Rob Ford’s not popular despite being fat. He’s popular because of it

Stephen Marche
From Saturday’s Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Oct. 15, 2010 7:24PM EDT
Last updated Friday, Oct. 15, 2010 10:53PM EDT

The mounds of fat that encircle Rob Ford’s body like great deflated tires of defeat are truly unprecedented in Canadian politics.

We have had chunky political candidates before, but the front-runner in Toronto’s current contest to be mayor is so fat that his belly is invariably the first thing you notice about him.

Yet far from harming his political image, his bulk is the key to his appeal. Neither intelligent nor sympathetic, Mr. Ford offers voters fat. And we want fat. In fat, we see ourselves.

Let no one confuse Rob Ford’s obesity with jollity. Every extra pound on Mr. Ford’s frame is an extra pound of rage. His angry fat is perfectly of our time.

Fat is the physical manifestation of postindustrial life. It is no coincidence that the obesity crisis in North America has occurred simultaneously with the decline of manufacturing in our cities. The foods that we love to eat originated in a time when the lives of men and women were devoted to manual labour.

In the late 19th century, a typical steel-factory worker in the Northeastern United States poured molten steel for 12 hours a day, six days a week. In such conditions, the major problem wasn’t hypertension but consuming enough calories quickly enough to last through an entire shift without wasting break time.

Therefore doughnuts, hamburgers and steak-and-cheese sandwiches. Which we continue to eat sitting behind desks while we process paperwork.

For men trapping fur or working in a lumber camp, poutine makes sense. Not for kids heading to a bar after a hard day’s telemarketing.

Whether through the migration to white-collar jobs or through rust-belt unemployment, we have lost the physical labour but we have kept the diet that once sustained it.

Fat is the bodily equivalent of the boarded-up factories in once-industrial powerhouses like Windsor and St. Catharines and Buffalo and Cleveland. Fat in North America is work that is not being done.

Before the advent of television, fat politicians such as Mr. Ford were not such an anomaly. In the early 20th century, the enormous body of U.S. president William Taft could be taken as evidence of a humanizing self-indulgence. Gluttony, after all, is the least vicious of the seven deadly sins. A big gut signified that the president was in the end, despite his status, one of the boys.

For kings, fatness symbolized luxury, particularly the luxury of not doing any manual labour. Henry VIII weighed so much that he was constantly having new suits of armour designed to accommodate his ever-expanding gut, and his coffin broke through the supports at his funeral.

Julius Caesar, in Shakespeare’s play of the same name, dislikes Cassius because he is too thin. For Caesar, fat men in power are happy, satisfied, forgiving. Thin men are conniving. He says:

Let me have men about me that are fat/ Sleek-headed men, and such as sleep o’ nights:/ Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look;/ He thinks too much; such men are dangerous.

Television rendered Caesar’s advice moot. Once TV had entered our homes and we became preoccupied with how everyone looked, we needed our political leaders trim; it signified efficiency and self-control, which is why jogging remains one of the most widespread clichés of political advertising, for conservatives and liberals alike.

In America, Mike Huckabee, an otherwise unexceptional Republican governor from Arkansas, became a national contender only after he published his polemic against junk food and personal memoir of lifestyle modification called Quit Digging Your Grave with a Knife and Fork.

Now all of that is changing, at least in Southern Ontario. Mr. Ford doesn’t run from his fat or hide it – and why should he? His gut embodies the parts of the city and the country hardest-hit by the changing nature of our economy and the evisceration of manual labour from our society.

His fat is all he has going for him; it makes him look working-class even though he’s a drunk-driving, second-generation political dilettante, a man who has never been faced with the financial difficulties of ordinary people. Mr. Ford’s body reflects the decline around us better than any story he could tell.

Toronto’s current mayor is David Miller, as calm, generous and smart a man as you would want to meet; he achieved nothing in office. The biggest story of his six years was that he managed to lose weight. Newspapers reported on his regimen; the mayor was proud of his accomplishment.

And yet with every pound that he lost, it seemed that he became more and more separated from the reality of the city around him, separated from the lives of people who have to get to their jobs and cook meals. Who can blame voters now for wanting a fat man?

Stephen Marche is a novelist and the culture columnist for Esquire magazine. He lives in Toronto.

Advertisements

93 Responses to “Globe’s Marche uses “fat” 17 times in Rob Ford column”

  1. byng Says:

    it is absolutely disgusting – how indeed , does this hate tribe keep their jobs – certainly the welfare of the over-taxed and under-serviced residents of Toronto is the last thing the Globe cares about

    • w Says:

      THEN ITS ABOUT TIME THE OVER-TAXED AND UNDER -SERVICED RESIDENTS STOP PURCHASING the globe and mail.Perhaps Marche will get a raise and a clap on the back from the editor.Are the smug looks still there?

  2. Kingston Says:

    Well Blue if you have the article, you are going to have to post it. The Globe and Mail have removed it.

  3. Michael Harkov Says:

    See what happens when the elite left-tard journalistic class know that, for so long, they have been utterly wrong and out of touch? They get petulant and so, so unprogressive. 😀

  4. Michael Harkov Says:

    Well, well, well. I follow your link again this morning, which directed me to the article in question only last night, and this is what I see – “Oops! We can’t find the page you’re looking for.”

    Heh. So…….down the memory hole she goes. I hope someone managed to grab a screen shot. 😀

  5. Michael Harkov Says:

    Yep, I’ve searched every inch all over the Globe and Mail, and even Google doesn’t have it anymore – *POOF – gone. I would have liked to have been in a fly on the wall of a certain meeting that probably took place this morning, LOL.

    Again, isn’t it amazing how progressive these jerks like to tell each other, until they are losing?

    Check out the Tweets that were following this story before it went all X-Files on us and disappeared –

    http://topsy.com/www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/rob-fords-not-popular-despite-being-fat-hes-popular-because-of-it/article1759870/

    Interesting. 😀

  6. john Says:

    “Seriously, how does the editor keep his/her job after allowing this to be printed?”

    HOW!? Really? You have to ask how? Because his editor is just as big of a skeez as he is. That’s how.

    Over the last few years I have lost any final, small, remaining respect I may once have had for journalists.

    Any journalists, and that includes the two possible conservative journalists in Canada (there have been possible sightings of such a creature) are scum.

    • w Says:

      by clicking on the link it makes it look like they are trying to cover up the egg on their face ,luckily there is still some evidence that it was printed and who originated it.

  7. Jen Says:

    Dean I went to see his article but saw this instead

    404: File not found
    Oops! We can’t find the page you’re looking for.

    1.You arrived here via a search engine or another website and the link is old and/or broken.
    2.We have a bad link and you were unlucky enough to click on it.
    3.You might have mistyped the address of the page you were looking for.
    To get back on track try searching for what you were looking for or return to the globeandmail.com homepage.

    So I went to their homepage typed Stephen’s full name and got:

    Rob Ford’s not popular despite being fat. He’s popular because of …
    Oct 15, 2010 … Stephen Marche. From Saturday’s Globe and Mail …. Stephen Marche is a novelist and the culture columnist for Esquire magazine. …

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/toronto/city-votes/city-votes-news/rob-fords-not-popular-despite-being-fat-hes-popular-because-of-it/article1759870/
    .Rob Ford’s not popular despite being fat. He’s popular because of …
    Stephen Marche. From Saturday’s Globe and Mail. Published Friday, Oct. 15, 2010 7:24PM EDT. Last updated Friday, Oct. 15, 2010 10:53PM EDT …

    But, when I did highlighted one of those items I encountered ‘ OOPS’…….

    Unfortunately, the editor didn’t erase the entire headline to Marche’s story.

  8. Rose Says:

    The bigot deserves to be fired, would he be allowed to insult the elderly, mentally ill, disabled, blacks or chinese like he did fat people?

  9. Rich Day Says:

    Yellow journalism at its finest. The Star and Mop&Pail are truly soulmates.

  10. hudson duster Says:

    “this hate tribe keep their jobs”

    No, these are the sensitive enlightened members of our society! Seriously, a few days ago I caught a glimpse of a column by noted globist halfwit gary mason about Palin – got as far as the first use of “Barbie Doll” and quit. Not only do they indulge in grade school personal insults, but they’re unaware of how cliched and second rate their work is.

    • w Says:

      they abuse their power of “journalism”to show the public ,of all shapes and sizes ,as to what they are capable of doing,but; are still trying to perfect it,give them time,they are working at it,now only if they add effort.

  11. wilson Says:

    ‘Progressives’ attack the person, that’s what they do.

    Harper’s So Fat He Has His Own Zip Code
    http://calgarygrit.blogspot.com/2007/01/harpers-so-fat-he-has-his-own-zip-code.html

    • BC Blue Says:

      Yup, anyone who has been in the political arena knows that the most disrespectful, personal attacks always come from the “progressives”.

  12. TS Says:

    I read the article. It was disgusting. I think its more disgusting that the G&M can print **** like this and when they get backlash, just pull it down and pretend it never existed. If I was Ford, I would seriously consider a lawsuit, and the fact that the G&M erased it proves that they knew they were wrong to print it.

    Lets not let this story go away. I encourage everyone to post text of this article on their own blogs, and send copies to the Globe and Mail along with your angry comments. I would also love to see a boycott of the paper but I don’t know anyone who reads it anyways.

    i have a copy of the article I grabbed out of my Firefox cache using an Add-on called Cache Viewer.
    If anyone wants to try to pull it out of their cache, here is the link to Cache Viewer:

    https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/2489/

    just search for ‘fat’. God knows it was used enough in the article!

    if that doesnt work, here is the full text of the article:

    start of article:
    ——————————————————————–
    Rob Ford’s not popular despite being fat. He’s popular because of it

    Stephen Marche
    From Saturday’s Globe and Mail
    Published Friday, Oct. 15, 2010 7:24PM EDT
    Last updated Friday, Oct. 15, 2010 10:53PM EDT

    The mounds of fat that encircle Rob Ford’s body like great deflated tires of defeat are truly unprecedented in Canadian politics.

    We have had chunky political candidates before, but the front-runner in Toronto’s current contest to be mayor is so fat that his belly is invariably the first thing you notice about him.

    Yet far from harming his political image, his bulk is the key to his appeal. Neither intelligent nor sympathetic, Mr. Ford offers voters fat. And we want fat. In fat, we see ourselves.

    Let no one confuse Rob Ford’s obesity with jollity. Every extra pound on Mr. Ford’s frame is an extra pound of rage. His angry fat is perfectly of our time.

    Fat is the physical manifestation of postindustrial life. It is no coincidence that the obesity crisis in North America has occurred simultaneously with the decline of manufacturing in our cities. The foods that we love to eat originated in a time when the lives of men and women were devoted to manual labour.

    In the late 19th century, a typical steel-factory worker in the Northeastern United States poured molten steel for 12 hours a day, six days a week. In such conditions, the major problem wasn’t hypertension but consuming enough calories quickly enough to last through an entire shift without wasting break time.

    Therefore doughnuts, hamburgers and steak-and-cheese sandwiches. Which we continue to eat sitting behind desks while we process paperwork.

    For men trapping fur or working in a lumber camp, poutine makes sense. Not for kids heading to a bar after a hard day’s telemarketing.

    Whether through the migration to white-collar jobs or through rust-belt unemployment, we have lost the physical labour but we have kept the diet that once sustained it.

    Fat is the bodily equivalent of the boarded-up factories in once-industrial powerhouses like Windsor and St. Catharines and Buffalo and Cleveland. Fat in North America is work that is not being done.

    Before the advent of television, fat politicians such as Mr. Ford were not such an anomaly. In the early 20th century, the enormous body of U.S. president William Taft could be taken as evidence of a humanizing self-indulgence. Gluttony, after all, is the least vicious of the seven deadly sins. A big gut signified that the president was in the end, despite his status, one of the boys.

    For kings, fatness symbolized luxury, particularly the luxury of not doing any manual labour. Henry VIII weighed so much that he was constantly having new suits of armour designed to accommodate his ever-expanding gut, and his coffin broke through the supports at his funeral.

    Julius Caesar, in Shakespeare’s play of the same name, dislikes Cassius because he is too thin. For Caesar, fat men in power are happy, satisfied, forgiving. Thin men are conniving. He says:

    Let me have men about me that are fat/ Sleek-headed men, and such as sleep o’ nights:/ Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look;/ He thinks too much; such men are dangerous.

    Television rendered Caesar’s advice moot. Once TV had entered our homes and we became preoccupied with how everyone looked, we needed our political leaders trim; it signified efficiency and self-control, which is why jogging remains one of the most widespread clichés of political advertising, for conservatives and liberals alike.

    In America, Mike Huckabee, an otherwise unexceptional Republican governor from Arkansas, became a national contender only after he published his polemic against junk food and personal memoir of lifestyle modification called Quit Digging Your Grave with a Knife and Fork.

    Now all of that is changing, at least in Southern Ontario. Mr. Ford doesn’t run from his fat or hide it – and why should he? His gut embodies the parts of the city and the country hardest-hit by the changing nature of our economy and the evisceration of manual labour from our society.

    His fat is all he has going for him; it makes him look working-class even though he’s a drunk-driving, second-generation political dilettante, a man who has never been faced with the financial difficulties of ordinary people. Mr. Ford’s body reflects the decline around us better than any story he could tell.

    Toronto’s current mayor is David Miller, as calm, generous and smart a man as you would want to meet; he achieved nothing in office. The biggest story of his six years was that he managed to lose weight. Newspapers reported on his regimen; the mayor was proud of his accomplishment.

    And yet with every pound that he lost, it seemed that he became more and more separated from the reality of the city around him, separated from the lives of people who have to get to their jobs and cook meals. Who can blame voters now for wanting a fat man?

    Stephen Marche is a novelist and the culture columnist for Esquire magazine. He lives in Toronto.
    ————————————————————————-
    end of article

    if anyone wants a copy of the original article, I will email it to you,

  13. real conservative Says:

    Can Rob sue on this? First of all, Rob is running for Mayor of Toronto and not PM. So why is the Globe so concerned with the guy running? Secondly, I think this is public ridicule taken to a new level and possibly actionable.

  14. Dudley Morris Says:

    This article is a good example of why “Esquire” sucks. Pure puffed-out aren’t-I-clever blather that says next to nothing – making no point that couldn’t have been expressed in one short paragraph – and just rambles along until the word count is reached.

    • w Says:

      and then there are his novels worded appropriately ….’see Spot run,see Dick run,see Dick and Spot play’ -said he was a novelist,didn’t say a good one

  15. TangoJuliette Says:

    “Culture” columnist for Esq..? ..’scuse me. . . H O R K ! B A R F! & H U R L ! …chunks, that is.

    ttfn,

    tj

    t.e&o.e.

  16. JDot Says:

    Um, this is the Globe, the same paper who published Scott Ried’s “Kill him, kill him dead” Harper hater article.

    This is a par for the course.

    But great catch BC Blue. Man, I love this blog. The left has gone off the deep end. It would be amusing if it where not so sad..

  17. Jamie MacMaster Says:

    This just has to be someone trying to dupe us. I mean, the weekly rag in Pumphandle, Ontario wouldn’t hire a guy who writes like this.

    • w Says:

      maybe he should apply regardless of his qualifications,although the Pumphandle Rag does have certain standards to abide by ,whereas his present employer doesn’t

  18. Liz J Says:

    Since the Globe and Fail “lost it” send it to them, better still send it to Rob Ford so he can sue them . That sort of stuff is way over the top and has zero to do with issues pertaining to the City of Toronto Mayoralty.

  19. andycanuck Says:

    It also shows the columnist’s ignorance of history. Henry VIII got fat because he injured his leg jousting (an injury that never healed properly) and had to give up the martial activities like riding and jousting that had kept him thin. (And I’m no fan of Henry’s, BTW.)

    But on the bright side, I think we just found a volunteer to be a guard in any future Deconcentration Camps the government (any level of government) might care to create.

  20. Graham Says:

    Here is Rob’s response as emailed to me tonight:

    Dear ,

    As you may have already heard, an article was printed in today’s Globe and Mail that I feel is one of the most vile attacks I’ve ever seen in my ten years in politics. I’ve had a fair bit of mud thrown at me in this campaign, but I never thought I’d see a reputable paper like the Globe and Mail attack me for my appearance and my weight.

    I am absolutely appalled, but not entirely surprised. These personal attacks are coming because of the success of my campaign. I expected attacks like this for the simple reason that there are still many people out there who are resistant to the change I want to bring to City Hall.

    The entrenched establishment of lobbyists, consultants, and insiders who make their living from the Gravy Train will clearly stop at nothing to prevent me from being Mayor precisely because they know that I’m going to clean up City Hall, put an end to this nonsense, and stop the Gravy Train once and for all.

    But I can’t do it without your help.

    The election is only nine days away, and I need you, your family, friends, and colleagues all to get out to the polls and vote for the change we need and that only I can deliver.

    Advanced polls are open tomorrow from 10 AM to 6 PM all across the city. I encourage you to get out and vote tomorrow so that you can help get out the vote on Election Day.

    On Monday October 25th, I am very confident that the people of Toronto will elect me as their next Mayor because they know I am the only candidate who can go down to City Hall, straighten things out, and stop the Gravy Train.

    Thank you for your ongoing support. Please remember to vote and have your voice heard.

    Sincerely,
    Rob Ford.

    • Graham Says:

      Rob, as usual, takes the high road.

      • real conservative Says:

        Yup, he has been consistently doing this the whole campaign, His main opponent hides and lets his extensive network of sytem players slander Ford for his own amusement. Sad.

      • AL Says:

        Rob Ford always has gravy on his mind.

    • w Says:

      Spoken like a true gentleman,Rob
      I’m sure now that they know you won by a hefty margin.
      Congratulations.Despite the muck and mire from the globe and mail and the star, you came out on top.Your dedication and concern for the interests of the citizens of this city paid off.It was a proud moment when those numbers had shown the peoples choice.Thank you

  21. Ken Says:

    Thank you BC Blue for the coverage of this issue on your blog and thank you TS for digging up the text to the article.

  22. Graham Says:

    Notice how the media never report Smitherman was addicted to cocaine, or that he is a highschool drop out?

  23. NAT Says:

    I have a copy of the article which I copied and pasted into three emails, one to the National Post, one the editor of the G&M and one to Rob Ford directly.

    The article single hand-idly made Toronto’s most prestigious newspaper into the worst. If anyone wants a copy, please email me at radioheadfan@rogers.com

    Ironically, its not like Smitherman is svelte.

    • Graham Says:

      But Smitherman’s a Liberal/Socialist spendaholic, so him being chunky is ok.

      • real conservative Says:

        It shows he likes the finer things in life, unlike Ford. Who might eat at McD’s here and there on his own dime. Georgie eats at the best digs in town and somebody else is always paying.

    • w Says:

      always looked miserable,smug,and he’s more for George than for the ordinary citizen.Didn’t come across as anything else.

  24. Andrew Says:

    I like how the Globe has removed the article from its online version.

  25. Old Pete Says:

    Dear friends,
    I am just as angry as you are, but let’s not waste our time on the Globe and Mail. They are not worth it. Instead let’s focus on the man, Rob Ford.

    Rob Ford has a heart of gold, a heart filled with compassion, understanding, respect and forgiveness toward others.

    Rob Ford, as a City Councillor, is no stranger to being attacked, ridiculed and chastised by most if not all of his fellow councilllors on City Council. Yet, despite those relentless attacks etc. Rob Ford moved on, turning the other cheek, and pursuing his one and only goal, to work for and with the people of Toronto.

    That is the Rob Ford I know, that is the Rob Ford I will proudly call “His Worship Mayor Rob Ford” on October 25th.

  26. Hunter Says:

    If this was in the printed version, Ford has just won this election. I am sure that they only pulled the online article because even their lefty friends thought it was over the top, but they can’t make the printed version disappear.

    This will motivate voters to get out and vote Ford.

  27. chris Says:

    wow Mr. Marche – you didn’t really do well in the good looks gene pool – shall you be insulted for being ugly? Wow, the left leaning elitists infamous for preaching hatred and intolerance certainly have their knickers in a knot….good Lord, what an embarassement to Canada you are – GROW UP – the people will decide. as for Miller – he has DESTROYED the city – to such a point I insist people NOT visit – thankfully he is GONE

  28. Vern Johansson Says:

    Funniest comment I’ve read: “Once again, Rob Ford takes the high road”. Hahahahahahahahahahahahaha.
    Rob Ford couldn’t even find the high road much less take it.

  29. MariaS Says:

    Glad someone got the text for you BCBlue and so we have it here at your blog and at Blogging Tories. This is the kind of hate the Left spews and they have the gall to call us bigots.
    This particular writer is actually getting paid to write this? Hard to believe.
    I only happened to go looking for it because I saw a note from Rob Ford’s camp in my inbox that they sent out to the Torontonians about the Globe&Mail article and I thought his camp was blowing it up ….. but was I wrong… they in fact did not even mention that word “fat” is used 17 times in the article and that it has malign the good man to such a degree.
    I hope Rob Ford’s lawyers will have something to say about this disgraceful article in a paper which is supposed to be “Canada’s best”.
    Shameful.

  30. Ted Says:

    The odd thing, is the Globe is apretty right wing rag! What’s with the trashing on such a personal level? either Ford is a serious threat, or just a serious threat to the entitlement establishment of Toronto politics.

  31. GeoffC Says:

    You my friend==are a bonifide IDIOT..That is all!!

  32. Rose Says:

    Well Vern would you even know what the highroad looks like, you seem content to slither along in the ditch with your leftwing pals. Stay in the ditch Buttercup you people stink of hatred and bigotry these days, say hi to Liberal Media they’re the ones covered in mud and slime.

    The tolerance and diversity crowd are showing the court of public opinion how vile and hateful they are via MSM, I like watching their mask of civility slip whilsts screaming at the right “You lack decorum”.

  33. Blazingcatfur Says:

    You can view and download the cached Globe article in pdf format here – http://www.scribd.com/doc/39534485/Ford-Fat-G-amp-M-Article

  34. Vern Says:

    Marche’s article is pure bilge. The journalistic level, even discounting the disgusting ad hominem, is about the equivalent of a Grade 6 student. The Glop and Smell should hang it’s head in shame.

    Ford may be fat, but Marche is a moron. Ford can lose weight; what can Marche do?

  35. builder.b Says:

    Would he have written about a woman in politics like this ?

  36. Ted Says:

    most of you have missed a very serious point in this heinous attack–the Globe is a conservative newspaper. Th elaft has it’s share of sleaze, but why is a conservative rag like the globe writing garbage like this?

  37. Top Posts — WordPress.com Says:

    […] Globe’s Marche uses “fat” 17 times in Rob Ford column Just when you think journalism can’t sink any further, Stephen Marche pens this pile. “The mounds of fat […] […]

  38. real conservative Says:

    Globe’s Marche thinks with his little head 17 times in one article. Guy is not talent, just a hack.

    • w Says:

      I guess thinking with his little head gets him a lot of attention from his employer….bet hes the author of a lot of grafitti on the washroom stalls

  39. Realitycheck Says:

    To call Ford fat it’s the same as to call Smitherman gay. Waiting for a column in the same style on Smitherman, would be fun to read.

  40. Realitycheck Says:

    Ok. Definitely Stephen Marche should write it, one of his masterpicies is called Vampires as Gay Men
    http://www.esquire.com/features/thousand-words-on-culture/vampires-gay-men-1109

  41. The Clog Says:

    I don’t see anything wrong with this article. If anything, I’m curious to know how Rob Ford can stop Toronto’s ‘gravy train’ when he seems clearly to be incapable of moderating his own!

    • thomaus Says:

      Whoops! I usually don’t correct Internet typing, but seriously, ‘Gravy Train’ is always capitalized. See Rob’s email above.

      Ford’s campaign manager admitted they picked up the phrase from a focus group, and Rob’s been riding that ‘Gravy Train’ all through this election.

    • w Says:

      why would you see anything wrong with it?

  42. Roger Says:

    I see suddenly Ford supporters are demanding political correctness. Nice.

  43. potvin Says:

    This Marche guy sounds like a real fathead.

  44. Joel Gulley Says:

    How could any one take Stephan Marche as a serious journalist ever again. It is obvious he is a hack journalist. e is an embarrasment o the paper and himself . He should be ashmed of himself

  45. Kevin Says:

    But he is obviously overweight….how can someone who obviously doesn’t take care of himself take care of the city?

    Funny how a politician who is not known for being politically correct is so incensed now when it hits home….

    Go run mile Mr Ford – it’s good for you!

  46. Globe’s associate editor explains why Marche’s Rob Ford “fat” column was removed « BC Blue: One BC Conservative's view on it all… Says:

    […] and Mail’s associate editor Sylvia Stead tries to explain why Stephen Marche’s column (see here) on Rob Ford was pulled from the Globe’s […]

  47. Corpulent Says:

    I haven’t read every post here–so forgive me if this is redundant–but the thing to know is that Marche ain’t no journalist, for what it’s worth. He’s an intellectual wannabe novelist who fills his trousers as a lecturer somewhere (I forget where and I don’t care where). He’s a product of the eternally incestuous culturati cabal in T.O. (hubby of TorLife ed Sarah Fulford; son-in-law of undead journo Bob Fulf)–with just a dash of new Brooklyn elitism admixed. Only a wanker as extraordinarily buffoonish as Marche could pen such a pretentious, childish, and offensive pile of garbage (and I say this as someone who is generally centrist/centre-left politically [e.g., I’m not voting for Ford]). Go transmit some of your flatulent scrawls to Esquire, BrooklynBoy.

  48. Ernie Anderson Says:

    Very…. Informative and Interesting Blog… Thanks.. for sharing…. 🙂

  49. L Says:

    Big food is all about American food chains. A sandwich to me was two normal slices of bread with a thin layer, not the huge pile-on.

  50. w Says:

    Remember to keep the Globe and Mail beside your toilet in the event you run out ,and ,with any luck at all, it will be a Marche column that gets the brunt of it.His crap was an affront to those that are not of the same physique that he is.Hopefully ,those that are a bit overweight take this as an affront and insult and presume that the article went through an editors scrutiny and was accepted .In short ,Marche is the example of what everyone should look
    like.Hopefully,too,that everyones IQ is not based on his.Wonder what this has done to their readership,can’t see it improving.

  51. w Says:

    hope to see those that were going to leave the city if Ford wins,do so and take the globe and mail with them.Hope its a real rural area with outside toilets,the globe and mail will serve as a purpose then.

  52. Gord Says:

    The article did not attack or criticize Ford for being fat. It explained the cultural significance of it. I thought it was smart. I guess it was too smart for a lot of people.

    • andycanuck Says:

      And when I type, “Brilliant observation, Einstein,” I’m not attacking of criticizing you, Gord the Rocket Scientist.

  53. How did Spector’s Harper rumour column even get posted « BC Blue: One BC Conservative's view on it all… Says:

    […] was exactly the same as when Stephen Marche wrote the infamous Rob Ford “fat” column that blew up in his face. No answers were ever given as to how it got into print by associate […]


Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: